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Protests against Brett Kavanaugh reach boiling point, as Senate prepares for confirmation vote

"Let them hear our rage."

Women attend a rally and vigil in front of a Brooklyn court house calling to stop the nomination of Republican Supreme court candidate Judge Brett Kavanaugh on October 3, 2018 in New York City. (Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Women attend a rally and vigil in front of a Brooklyn court house calling to stop the nomination of Republican Supreme court candidate Judge Brett Kavanaugh on October 3, 2018 in New York City. (Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

As the FBI’s brief investigation of the sexual misconduct and assault allegations against Judge Brett Kavanaugh was wrapping up, ending late Wednesday evening, thousands of activists across the country were just getting started.

Protests against Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court seemed to reach a boiling point Wednesday evening and into Thursday, as news surfaced that the Senate plans to hold a confirmation vote as early as Friday.

On Wednesday, demonstrators in nearly 170 cities across the country held rallies and vigils, organized by MoveOn. In Brooklyn, the largely female crowd spent several seconds yelling during the rally to ensure people could “hear our rage.”

Hundreds of protesters also gathered in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., where “#StopKavanaugh” was projected onto the building.

Demonstrators showed up in droves in states with swing vote senators, calling on Republican Sens. Susan Collins (ME), Lisa Murkowski (AK), and Jeff Flake (AZ), as well as red-state Democrat Joe Manchin (WV), to vote against Kavanaugh.

On Thursday, thousands of protesters participated in a nationwide walk-out — organized by the Women’s March, Planned Parenthood, Black Women’s Roundtable, and several other organizations — to signal their opposition to the Supreme Court nominee. In Washington, D.C., protesters gathered at the E. Barrett Prettyman Federal Courthouse, where Kavanaugh currently works, before marching to the Supreme Court. Numerous celebrities were reportedly in attendance, including Alicia Keys, Whoopi Goldberg, and Tracee Ellis Ross.

Senate Judiciary Committee Republicans had initially planned to push Kavanaugh’s nomination through without an investigation, until Flake joined committee Democrats last week in calling for an investigation into claims that Kavanaugh attempted to rape Dr. Christine Blasey Ford while they were both in high school in the 1980s.

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As ThinkProgress reported Thursday, the investigation largely served Republican interests, with the FBI completing only nine comprehensive interviews and no examination into whether Kavanaugh may have lied under oath about his drinking. Indeed, dozens of sources were not contacted when they offered to testify. Investigators also did not talk to Kavanaugh or Dr. Ford.

Protests will likely continue Thursday evening and into Friday morning, as senators prepare to cast their votes on the nomination.

This piece will be updated with news of more protests throughout the day Thursday.