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White House press secretary calls on pro-Trump fake news site

Sean Spicer is legitimizing conspiracy-mongering sites by calling on them during press conferences.

White House press secretary Sean Spicer calls on a reporter during the daily briefing at the White House on Tuesday. CREDIT: AP Photo/Susan Walsh
White House press secretary Sean Spicer calls on a reporter during the daily briefing at the White House on Tuesday. CREDIT: AP Photo/Susan Walsh

Press Secretary Sean Spicer is sending a message to the traditional media with his first calls at White House press conferences.

On Monday, the first question went to the New York Post, a conservative-leaning outlet, instead of the traditional choice, the Associated Press. On Tuesday, the first question went to LifeZette — a website founded and headed by conservative pundit and Trump cheerleader Laura Ingraham.

Jim Stinson of LifeZette took the opportunity to point out that “immigration enforcement organizations and activists” were concerned that Trump hadn’t yet acted to repeal DACA and DAPA — two immigration executive orders — and ask when they could expect Trump to do so.

LifeZette was founded in 2015, and throughout the 2016 campaign was an avid participant in the phenomenon now dubbed “fake news,” trafficking in conspiracy theories about Hillary Clinton.

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In a video titled “Clinton Body Count,” released in April 2016, a LifeZette correspondent, over an ominous music track, suggests without evidence that the Clinton family may have had some role in John F. Kennedy Jr.’s plane crash, as well as deaths of various Democratic operatives.

CREDIT: Screenshot, LifeZette/Google Cache
CREDIT: Screenshot, LifeZette/Google Cache

According to The Intercept, the video garnered 400,000 shares and 14 million views.

Interestingly, the video — along with another article titled “ 10 People Under the Clinton Curse” that alleged the Clintons were somehow connected to “nearly 90 bodies” — have both disappeared from LifeZette’s website and social media feeds.

The video is still available on other sites, and the article is available via Google cache.

CREDIT: screenshot, Facebook
CREDIT: screenshot, Facebook

Another LifeZette video from October 2016 alleges without credible evidence that voting machines in 16 states could be “compromised,” because the company that made them was purchased by George Soros.

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In truth, Soros had not purchased the company, and the company didn’t even provide voting machines for use in the general election.

LifeZette also promoted the conspiracy theory — based on a leaked exchange from Wikileaks — that Hillary Clinton campaign chair John Podesta participated in occult rituals involving blood sacrifice.

The conspiracy theory was based on emails sent to Podesta’s brother and forwarded to the Clinton aide by Marina Abramovic, inviting him to a dinner party. Notably, Podesta didn’t respond to the email.

“I’m outraged, because this is taken completely out of my context,” Abramovic told ArtNews about the conspiracy theory, which went viral. “It was just a normal dinner. It was actually just a normal menu, which I call spirit cooking. There was no blood, no anything else. We just call things funny names, that’s all.”

Credit: Screenshot, LifeZette
Credit: Screenshot, LifeZette

#SpiritCooking became a top trending hashtag in the week before the election.

Trump, who accused CNN of being “fake news” at his first press conference since the election, reportedly considered LifeZette founder and owner Laura Ingraham to be his press secretary.

This post has been updated to include additional LifeZette headlines.