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‘Shame!’: Hundreds of anti-Kavanaugh protesters swarm Capitol Hill ahead of confirmation vote

Senators prepare to vote on Kavanaugh's SCOTUS nomination while demonstrators chant, "Remember who you work for!" outside.

WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 06:  A demonstrator holds up a "NOPE" poster during a protest against the confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh, outside of the Supreme Court, October 6, 2018 in Washington, DC. The Senate is set to hold a final vote Saturday evening to confirm the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 06: A demonstrator holds up a "NOPE" poster during a protest against the confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh, outside of the Supreme Court, October 6, 2018 in Washington, DC. The Senate is set to hold a final vote Saturday evening to confirm the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Hundreds of demonstrators flooded Capitol Hill on Saturday chanting, “Shame! Shame! Shame!” ahead of the Senate’s final vote on the Supreme Court nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh. Members of the U.S. Senate are poised to confirm Kavanaugh to the country’s court of last defense.

For this, protesters are angry. There is an entire litany of grievances against Kavanaugh. There’s a good chance he will overturn Roe v. Wade. Others say that he doesn’t have the judicial temperament to oversee cases with liberal plaintiffs. And of course, there are the allegations against him of sexual assault or misbehavior with at least three women.

The totality of Kavanaugh’s record has made it such that he is set to be the most unpopular judge in the Supreme Court’s history.

“He will be the first justice nominated by someone who lost the popular vote to earn his seat on the bench with support from senators representing less than half of the country while having his nomination opposed by a majority of the country,” wrote Washington Post reporter Philip Bump.

People from all over the country descended on Washington D.C. for this moment. Signs on the Hill read “We Believe Survivors.” Other demonstrators chanted, “Remember who you work for!” and “November is coming!

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“It was hard not do feel depleted this morning. But I don’t anymore. This was inspiring. We’re ready for this,” said Sophie Ellman-Golan‏ with the Women’s March on Twitter. 

Already, police have begun removing and arresting demonstrators from the steps of the Capitol dome.

CNN correspondent Ryan Nobles said on Twitter that Capitol Hill police will not release repeat offenders after they pay a fine, meaning protesters will likely be held behind bars until Tuesday. That’s likely to be a lot of demonstrators, as many of the hundreds who were arrested on Thursday returned to the Hill on Saturday for the big vote.

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President Donald Trump commented on Saturday’s protests on Twitter, but just to say Women for Kavanaugh are gathering on the Hill. While dozens of pro-Kavanaugh organizers took to Capitol Hill on Friday, there aren’t many — if any — at the Hill on Saturday. A Fox News reporter said as much during her live broadcast:

Activists have protested Kavanaugh’s nomination for months but these demonstrations have only intensified after the judge was accused of sexual assault by three women.

Sexual assault survivors have since led the protests, sharing their stories — many for the first time — with senators and the public at large. Saturday’s protest was organized by women-led groups like the Women’s March, Planned Parenthood Action, and the Center for Popular Democracy.

The president has spread anti-Semitic conspiracy theories about these organizers, calling them “paid professionals” funded by George Soros. “No one can pay for someone’s lived experiences,” replied Ana Maria Archila, a sexual assault survivor who garnered national attention for confronting Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ) about his vote.

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“The pain, the trauma, and the rage that I expressed when I spoke with Senator Jeff Flake in an elevator were my own, and I held it for more than 30 years to protect the people I love from it,” she added.