The Morning Pride: December 15, 2011

Welcome to The Morning Pride, ThinkProgress LGBT’s 8:45 AM round-up of the latest in LGBT policy, politics, and some culture too! Here’s what we’re reading this morning, but let us know what you’re checking out as well. Follow us all day on Twitter at @TPEquality.

– Several Republican presidential candidates have chosen gay delegates for the DC primary.

– A proposed DC bill would allow same-sex couples married in DC to also divorce in DC, even if they are not currently DC residents, since states that do not recognize same-sex marriage do not grant same-sex divorces either.

– The Virginia Board of Social Services has approved a new policy that allows adoption agencies to discriminate on the basis of age, gender, disability, religion, political belief, family status, and sexual orientation.

– Sen. John Kerry (D-MA) is urging the Department of Education to revise higher education financial aid policies that discriminate against the children of same-sex couples and transgender students.

– Since winning her case in the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals that she was unfairly fired for being transgender, Vandy Beth Glenn has returned to her job in the Georgia legislature.

Chestnut Hill College, a Catholic university outside Philadelphia has updated its non-discrimination policy to protect sexual orientation and gender identity.

– Facebook has launched a new initiative that helps users who express suicidal thoughts connect with a crisis counselor.

– When is the right time to talk to young people about LGBT people?

– Equality North Carolina responds to a firing range’s “pansies converted daily” billboard.

– Is embracing heteronormative values the best approach for the gay rights movement?

– LGBT groups are decrying ABC’s new sitcom “Work It” for its presentation of unrealistic gender-norms and stereotypes about women in the workplace.

– Northern Cyprus has agreed to repeal its law criminalizing homosexuality.

– Australian Finance Minister Penny Wong and her partner have had a child.