The Morning Pride: May 25, 2012

Welcome to The Morning Pride, ThinkProgress LGBT’s daily round-up of the latest in LGBT policy, politics, and some culture too! Here’s what we’re reading this morning, but please let us know what stories you’re following as well. Follow us all day on Twitter at @TPEquality.

– A new coalition of LGBT-friendly churches and African-American organizations is opposing conservative efforts to drive a wedge between black voters. Check out NoWedge2012.com.

– Washington, DC is celebrating Black Pride this weekend.

– A new survey finds that 43 percent of Black gay youth have attempted or considered suicide.

– The Maine Education Association has endorsed marriage equality.

– Over 150 Maine churches will take an extra collection on Father’s Day to support the campaign against the marriage equality initiative.

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– A North Carolina activist is going to walk over 80 miles from his home to deliver a letter against Amendment One to his senator in Raleigh.

– The Family Research Council has presented a “pro-family” award to Ron Baity, one of the most vile anti-gay preachers in the country.

– Meet state Sen. Al McAffrey (D), Oklahoma’s only openly gay lawmaker.

– A Texas school has compromised with a graduating senior wishing to crossdress at commencement.

– Over 80,000 have signed a Change.org petition urging Dictionary.com to amend its definition of “marriage” to be more inclusive.

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– Courage, the Catholic Church’s anti-gay chastity ministry, is holding its 13th annual sports camp for men this weekend to help them become “manlier,” and thus somehow less gay — an insult to manly gay athletes everywhere.

Chile will soon cover the costs of sexual reassignment surgery for transgender citizens.

– Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe believes homosexuality must be condemned or men will stop impregnating women, which “will lead to extinction.”

– A gay club in West Hollywood has banned bachelorette parties, citing their insensitivity to marriage inequality.

– CNN takes a look at the complicated rules for transgender athletes and the unique case of Keelin Godsey, the first openly trans Olympic athlete.