Trump said Mexico would be ‘thrilled to be paying for the wall.’ They are not thrilled.

The Art of The Fail

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, right, speaks during a joint statement with Mexico President Enrique Pena Nieto, left, at Los Pinos, the official presidential residence, in Mexico City, Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2016. Trump is calling his surprise visit to Mexico City Wednesday a ‘great honor.’ CREDIT: AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, right, speaks during a joint statement with Mexico President Enrique Pena Nieto, left, at Los Pinos, the official presidential residence, in Mexico City, Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2016. Trump is calling his surprise visit to Mexico City Wednesday a ‘great honor.’ CREDIT: AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills

Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto has canceled a meeting with Donald Trump that was scheduled for next week. The abrupt move came as Trump announced his plans to move forward with the construction of a wall — and his insistence that Mexico pay its cost.

“I lament the U.S.’ decision to continue constructing a wall that far from uniting us, divides us. Mexico does not believe in walls,” Peña Nieto said.

The response from Mexico was much different than Trump promised on the campaign trail. In a speech following his victory in last February’s caucus in Nevada, Trump said that Mexico would be “thrilled to be paying for the wall” and “very happy.”

Trump’s pronouncement about the wall was one of 663 promises he made during the campaign.

Trump promised easy solutions and an improved relationship with Mexico. Now, as the New York Times reports, “Decades of friendly relations between the nations — on matters involving trade, security and migration — seemed to be unraveling.” Historians say this is a low point in bilateral relations between the two countries last seen in the era of Calvin Coolidge.

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Last night, House Speaker Paul Ryan said that Congress would provide the full costs of the wall — which he estimated at $14 billion — and figure out a way to make Mexico pay for it later.