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Trumpcare is still really, really unpopular

A new KFF poll finds that the American Health Care Act has just a 31 percent approval rating.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. pauses while meeting with the media to discuss healthcare, Tuesday, May 9, 2017, on Capitol Hill in Washington. CREDIT: AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. pauses while meeting with the media to discuss healthcare, Tuesday, May 9, 2017, on Capitol Hill in Washington. CREDIT: AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Just 31 percent of Americans are “very favorable” or “somewhat favorable” toward the American Health Care Act, colloquially known as Trumpcare, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation poll released on Wednesday.

Pollsters found that “the public has increasingly negative views of how their health care will be affected by proposed changes.”

The poll was conducted between May 16 and 22, days before the Congressional Budget Office issued an analysis finding that the latest iteration of AHCA would cause 23 million people to lose their insurance over the next decade.

But even without access to that information, fewer than one-sixth of respondents said they expected the bill to improve the cost or quality of their care, or their ability to stay insured. Nearly half said they anticipated the bill would make the cost of their coverage or their family’s coverage get worse.

CREDIT: kff.org
CREDIT: kff.org

Since Trumpcare passed the House four weeks ago, Republican senators have been deliberating over how to get some version of it approved by their chamber. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) tried last week to moderate expectations, saying that he doesn’t say an immediate path forward for the legislation. Republicans can only afford to lose two votes, but McConnell’s caucus appears split between those who want to seriously water down AHCA and those who would preserve its most extreme aspects.

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Based on the KFF poll, passing the House bill as-is looks like it would be an almost surefire political loser for the Republicans. Just 8 percent of respondents said the Senate should pass the House legislation with no changes; 24 percent said the House bill should pass with only small tweaks.