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Trump’s CIA director pick says Wikileaks is not credible

His past tweets say otherwise.

CIA Director-designate Rep. Michael Pompeo, R-Kan, accompanied by former Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 12, 2017, at his confirmation hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee. CREDIT: AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta
CIA Director-designate Rep. Michael Pompeo, R-Kan, accompanied by former Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 12, 2017, at his confirmation hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee. CREDIT: AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta

President-elect Donald Trump’s choice to led the CIA, Rep. Mike Pompeo (R-KS), said during his Thursday confirmation hearing that he does not view Wikileaks as a credible source of information. That view seemingly puts him at odds with the president-elect.

“I have never believed that Wikileaks was a credible source of information,” Pompeo said in response to a question from Sen. Angus King (D-ME) about past tweets.

Watch the full exchange:

And here’s Pompeo’s original twitter — sorry, tweet:

https://twitter.com/RepMikePompeo/status/757253079922270208

Pompeo’s dismissal of Wikileaks as a credible source contradicts more than his own past statements. It also deviates from the view of the president-elect, who cited Wikileaks in a Twitter attack on the Democratic National Committee (DNC) earlier this month.

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“Julian Assange said ‘a 14 year old could have hacked Podesta’ — why was DNC so careless? Also said Russians did not give him the info!” Trump tweeted on January 4.

The same day, he promoted an interview between Wikileaks’ head Julian Assange and Fox News personality Sean Hannity.

The day before the Pompeo hearing, during his first press conference as president-elect, Trump again cited hacked Democratic Party emails that Wikileaks had released.

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“We talk about the hacking. And hacking is bad. And it shouldn’t be done,” said Trump. “But look at the things that were hacked. Look at what was learned from that hacking.”

It seems that Pompeo doesn’t only take a harsher stance on Wikileaks than Trump, but also on Russia.

During the hearing, Pompeo affirmed his commitment to the current laws of the United States regarding issues like torture that had left human rights groups concerned. He also took a much more serious and direct approach than the president-elect to allegations of Russia’s interference in the recent presidential elections.

Responding to questions from Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA), Pompeo said he accepted the intelligence community’s assessments on Russian interference and that he would pursue his own investigation into Russia’s active attempts to undermine American influence around the globe.

To date, Trump’s strategy has been to deflect questions about Russia. He only finally admitted Russian interference in U.S. elections on Wednesday.