Trump DHS spokesman melts down after airlines refuse to cooperate with his family separation policy

Another Trump government official is lecturing businesses about patriotism.

U.S. Border Patrol agents take Central American asylum seekers into custody on June 12, 2018 near McAllen, Texas. The immigrant families were then sent to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection processing center for possible separation. (John Moore/Getty Images)
U.S. Border Patrol agents take Central American asylum seekers into custody on June 12, 2018 near McAllen, Texas. The immigrant families were then sent to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection processing center for possible separation. (John Moore/Getty Images)

Brands will only tolerate so much bad press, and President Donald Trump’s family separation policy has finally reached the point of no return for multiple airlines. In quick succession, three companies asked the government not to use their airplanes to separate migrant families on Wednesday.

After multiple eyewitness accounts surfaced of commercial airlines being used to transport children who had been ripped from their parents, American Airlines was first out of the gate with a statement that said, “We have no desire to be associated with separating families, or worse, to profit from it.”

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A short time later, United Airlines announced it had “contacted federal officials to inform them that they should not transport immigrant children on United aircraft who have been separated from their parents.”

Then Frontier Airlines added its company to the list of airlines that doesn’t want to be associated with Trump’s policy of breaking up families:

Department of Homeland Security press secretary Tyler Q. Houlton didn’t handle the rejection well, firing off a series of tweets in which he became the latest member of Trump’s government to criticize companies over a perceived lack of patriotism.

Despite Republicans’ stated preference for limited government involvement in business, Trump has made a habit of telling corporations how they should behave.