Women Are Unqualified ‘Emotionally’ To Be President, Famous Rapper Says

T.I., pictured here next to Iggy Azalea, said he thinks the Loch Ness monster has a better chance of becoming president than a woman. CREDIT: PHOTO BY CHRIS PIZZELLO/INVISION/AP
T.I., pictured here next to Iggy Azalea, said he thinks the Loch Ness monster has a better chance of becoming president than a woman. CREDIT: PHOTO BY CHRIS PIZZELLO/INVISION/AP

“Not to be sexist but” women are unqualified to hold the office of President of the United States because they are too emotional and make too many “rash decisions,” rapper T.I. said in an interview this weekend.

The rapper, who is also responsible for the rise of Iggy Azalea, said he could not vote for Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton — or any other woman presidential candidate — because she might “set off a nuke” and then act “like it didn’t happen.” Later, he said the “Loch Ness Monster” would have a better chance at becoming president than a woman.

His full remarks, via Vibe:

Not to be sexist but, I can’t vote for the leader of the free world to be a woman,” he said. “Just because, every other position that exists, I think a woman could do well. But the president? It’s kinda like, I just know that women make rash decisions emotionally — they make very permanent, cemented decisions — and then later, it’s kind of like it didn’t happen, or they didn’t mean for it to happen. And I sure would hate to just set off a nuke. [Other leaders] will not be able to negotiate the right kinds of foreign policy; the world ain’t ready yet. I think you might be able to the Loch Ness Monster elected before you could [get a woman].

https://youtube.com/watch?v=oaRojYkSCy0

The comments from T.I. are not totally surprising for him personally, but they do raise the larger issue of gender discrimination as women seek to advance professionally. Nearly 30 percent of women report experiencing workplace discrimination based on their gender, according to a 2013 report.

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Aside from the occasional T.I.-like remark, the bulk of modern gender discrimination is not as outwardly crass. Instead, women in the workplace face an “unconscious bias” that prevents them from being given leadership positions in traditionally male-dominated fields (the presidency, for example.)

“No legal barriers stand in women’s way when they reach for the male-heavy upper echelons of their organizations, yet they still make up less than 15 percent of executives at the biggest companies,” ThinkProgress’ Bryce Covert writes. “Men are more likely to be given money from investors, who are overwhelmingly male, even if women give the exact same pitch.”

Both Clinton and Republican presidential candidate Carly Fiorina have alluded to similar challenges in segments with BuzzFeed. While Fiorina’s take was lighthearted — she did a listicle-type video — Clinton took a more personal tone.

“As a woman, you’re really held to a totally different standard, and you’re expected to be both strong and vulnerable at the same time,” she said. “And so you just have to be who are you to the best of your ability.”

Update:

T.I. apologizes: